Malaysia, Truly Asia: The treacherous drive up to BOH Tea Plantation


I remember Dad telling us that we would go to a ‘safe’ BOH tea plantation. My expectations were subverted. Completely.

Photo | BIG_MOUSE | Warning signs are meant to be read

Photo | BIG_MOUSE | Warning signs are meant to be read

This was the first (and only I think) warning sign we saw when we turned right from the trunk road into small road no bigger than two cars laid abreast. Here’s a tip – tap your car horn multiple times when approaching corners. You wouldn’t be able to see oncoming cars and vice versa.

Photo | BIG_MOUSE | Barely enough for 2 cars to pass

Photo | BIG_MOUSE | Barely enough for 2 cars to pass

Road-coloured road humps are hardly visible to the naked eye, but are strategically-placed for a very good reason – to discourage suicidal drivers who speed. However, I am not sure how people can even think of speeding or driving recklessly. The roads are extremely small with just enough clearance for two cars side by side. Sometimes, it narrows to a point where it becomes a one-way road. One wrong move can send you plunging down the face of the mountain. Another silly mistake can cost you your side view mirrors or your body work when you scrap against someone else’s car.

Photo | BIG_MOUSE | In such situations, drivers will need to reverse their cars to allow others to pass

Photo | BIG_MOUSE | In such situations, drivers will need to reverse their cars to allow others to pass

Please note that this is a documentation of the journey up the mountain to the plantation. What goes up, must come down. If you thought that was scary, you need to clear your bowels before leaving BOH plantation. Driving up the mountain, we have the benefit of sticking close to the left side of the road. There was no danger of sliding off the mountain. Driving back down, there was no barrier, no nothing to give us a sense of protection.

Also, the teas sold were only slightly cheaper as compared to the shops in and around Cameron Highlands. The packet of ‘Orchard Splash’ tea sold at the plantation costs exactly the same as the ones sold at my resort’s gift shop. Morale of the story? There is actually no need to tackle this treacherous drive up. If you prefer not to risk your life (and your car’s), spend a little bit more to get your BOH tea elsewhere in the towns of Cameron Highlands. And if you live in Singapore, your local NTUC sells them tea too.

Photo | BIG_MOUSE | BOH Tea conveniently available at an NTUC outlet near you

Photo | BIG_MOUSE | BOH Tea conveniently available at an NTUC outlet near you

2 thoughts on “Malaysia, Truly Asia: The treacherous drive up to BOH Tea Plantation

  1. Pingback: Malaysia, Truly Asia: A series of posts to come soon « big_mouse..confusingABCrandom123

  2. Pingback: Malaysia, Truly Asia: In and about Cameron Highlands « big_mouse..confusingABCrandom123

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